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BRUCE COCKBURN > News > Collateral Damage

NGO Ideas

Here are some of the NGO’s (non-government organizations) that Bruce has supported over the years.


David Suzuki Blue Dot Tour - 2014 Bruce Cockburn - USC Celebrate Seeds

USC Canada

USC Canada promotes vibrant family farms, strong rural communities, and healthy ecosystems around the world. ( www.usc-canada.org )


The David Suzuki Foundation

The David Suzuki Foundation works with government, business and individuals to conserve our environment by providing science-based education, advocacy and policy work, and acting as a catalyst for the social change that today’s situation demands. ( www.davidsuzuki.org )


Left Behind By Suicide - Collateral Damage Project

“Collateral Damage: Images of Those Left Behind by Suicide,” will be a book of portraits, a website and gallery exhibition, telling the stories of people who have lost loved ones through suicide. When I was 16, my father took his own life. Although I have always been honest and open about how he died, I often felt I was left to deal with my pain and recovery in solitude – my grief paralyzed by the social stigma associated with such an act. Even now, 27 years later, I still have so many questions.

Through this book of images, I hope to find some answers and at the very least, start a long, overdue conversation. ~ Scott Chisholm ( leftbehindbysuicide.org )



Bruce Cockburn lends his voice to the Collateral Damage Project

Excerpt from: Huffintonpost.ca By Jason MacNeil

November 13, 2014 – Cockburn also continues to lend his voice and name to causes he feels strongly about. Earlier this year, he became involved with the Collateral Damage Project, a cause concerning suicide rates among men in Native or First Nations communities. Cockburn was approached by the organization’s founder Scott Chisholm about bringing awareness to the organization and doing a Public Service Announcement regarding it.

For a long time when I was younger all the people I knew who died were suicides,” he says. “There weren’t that many, maybe half a dozen people I was acquainted with who killed themselves. I’m not sure if I totally agree with the negativity of suicide if you are a cancer victim or if you’re terminally ill with anything and looking forward to years of suffering. As long as it doesn’t come back on your family.

“The big problem with suicide is in all but those circumstances it’s a terribly selfish act. Some of that made it seem like something to get involved with. And, of course, in the Native communities where suicide is a huge social issue, not just a matter of individuals, it’s kind of epidemic. So there’s a real point to try to head it off in that setting too.”


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